Remembering Janos Starker

Janos Starker







Cellist Janos Starker died yesterday in Bloomington, Indiana at the age of 88. You can read about his extraordinary career as a performer and teacher here and here. You may also be interested in this documentary.

Here is his recording of the opening movement of Bach’s Suite for Solo Cello, No. 1 in G Major:

This 1956 recording of the Dvorak Cello Concerto with the Philharmonia Orchestra and Walter Susskind is also remarkable:

Here are the Second and Third Movements of the Dvorak. Find other Starker recordings on iTunes.

About Timothy Judd

A native of Upstate New York, Timothy Judd has been a member of the Richmond Symphony violin section since 2001. He is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music where he earned the degrees Bachelor of Music and Master of Music, studying with world renowned Ukrainian-American violinist Oleh Krysa.

The son of public school music educators, Timothy Judd began violin lessons at the age of four through Eastman’s Community Education Division. He was a student of Anastasia Jempelis, one of the earliest champions of the Suzuki method in the United States.

A passionate teacher, Mr. Judd has maintained a private violin studio in the Richmond area since 2002 and has been active coaching chamber music and numerous youth orchestra sectionals.

In his free time, Timothy Judd enjoys working out with Richmond’s popular SEAL Team Physical Training program.

2 thoughts on “Remembering Janos Starker

  1. It was back in 1945 I believe. Right after the end of WWII. I was a kid of 9. Deported Jewish youngsters who spent the war at the mines of Bor in today’s Serbia, started to pour into our town, Timisoara in the Banat region of western Romania. They worked as forced labor in the mines throughout the war and were freed by the advancing Russian army. One of them was Janos Starker. He should have been twenty at that time. After being fed and nursed, he was invited by Jewish families to play at their homes. I attended as a kid one of these events. We weren’t fully aware at that time what great a cellist is performing in front of us. I am still awed about the opportunity to hear him so close in such an intimate environment. Have followed his career with great interest and pleasure but somehow I never made it to hear him again on stage. May his soul rest in peace. His recordings will be with us forever.

    • Thank you for sharing this story of your remarkable connection to Janos Starker, Reuben. It must have been an unforgettable experience to hear him at that time. Now, it seems to be a reminder of the life affirming power of music.

      For anyone who may have missed it, Lynn Harrell wrote a tribute which is worth reading.

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